5 Problems With Windows 10 and How To Solve Them Part 01

windows 10

Now that Windows 10 has overtaken Windows 7 as the most popular operating system, it’s bigger than ever. The sequel to Windows 8.1 has been out for more than three years now and has given users plenty of time to figure it out.

Luckily, most Windows 10 problems have been patched out by Microsoft over the last few years. There are still some security exploits and other bugbears that have either lingered or have been caused by recent Windows updates. This is in part because Windows 10 updates are still kind of a mess, the most recent of which, the October 2018 Update, caused all kinds of issues, including Blue Screen errors on Microsoft’s own Surface devices. 

That could be why the adoption of that update is only now starting to take off, just in time for the next one.

1- Checking you have a powerful enough PC

your PC will have to be capable of running Windows 10. This means that it must reach certain minimum system requirements.

The requirements for running Windows 10 are relatively low: A processor of 1GHz or faster; 1GB (32-bit) or 2GB (64-bit) of RAM; 16GB of free drive space; Microsoft DirectX 9 graphic device; and a Microsoft account combined with internet access.

To find out your PC’s spec, go to Control Panel and select System and Security, then System.

However, keep in mind that these are the minimum requirements, and you should shoot for higher specs to have a smooth and enjoyable experience. 

2- Avoiding inconvenient software update reboots

Windows 10 is, in many ways, a truly internet-based operating system. Mostly, this is a bonus but there are times when it isn’t – and Microsoft’s attitude towards operating system updates is one such time.

The most annoying part of automatic updates is the restarting, which can seemingly come at random (and inconvenient times). The simplest way to counteract this is to head to Windows Update (in Settings > Update & Security), click on Advanced Options and then Notify to Schedule Restart, which means the OS will request a reboot instead of interrupting everything you’re working on.

3- Updating old software to work with Windows 10

Each version of a new operating system comes with its own set of backwards compatibility issues and Windows 10 is no exception.

The transition from Windows 8.1 to 10 is far less jarring than the move from Windows 7 to 8 was, but there are still certain applications that can become broken and, in some cases, cease to work at all.

If a program isn’t working with Windows 10, try looking in the Windows Store for an update and, if that doesn’t work, delete and reinstall it. 

Now that Windows 10 has been out for a few years, most programs should be compatible with the operating system. If they aren’t, then they likely never will be.

Consider moving to a newer version of the software, or if it’s stopped being developed, it may be time to look for alternatives.

4- Changing privacy and Wi-Fi Sense settings

Data security is incredibly important, especially as hackers become increasingly sophisticated and the number of cyber-attacks is on the up.

Windows 10 comes with a decent set of built-in protection measures, but you can never be too careful. One such feature that should be disabled by privacy-minded individuals is Wi-Fi Sense, which automatically shares the Wi-Fi password across Windows 10 devices on the same account.

Microsoft updated Wi-Fi Sense to share less data, but switching it off is the ideal way of preventing anything you don’t want happening. To turn it off, go to the Start Menu, select Settings and click on Network & Internet, then Wi-Fi, and head to Manage Wi-Fi Settings – turn off all the options in here.

Also in Settings, it’s possible to get an overview of everything else happening on Windows 10 in terms of privacy – unsurprisingly, under the Privacy section. In here, you’ll be presented with a bunch of toggles that adjust some privacy options to help keep everything under control.

5- Setting up Windows Hello

Windows Hello is one of the most innovative features that Microsoft has built into Windows 10. Essentially, it lets a user login just by using facial recognition (or a fingerprint) virtually instantly.

The software, which is available to all Windows 10 users, does require special hardware (and most likely won’t work on older computers). Assuming you have the necessary hardware, how do you set up Windows Hello?

You need to go to the Start menu, click on Account, and select Change Account Settings. Select Sign-in Options and set a PIN. Once you’ve done this, there will be an option to Setup under Face. Select this and follow the instructions.

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